Monogrammed Velour and Flannel Baby Blanket

IMGP0400

It seems like everyone we know is having a baby or just had a baby. Luckily for me, many of these babies have been boys. I never sew anything for boys, so it’s a treat to get to pick out boy fabrics once in awhile.

I have a little stash of adorable boy flannel prints. I stock up on flannel every year during the Black Friday sale at Joann’s on any and every cute print I can find. It’s the best price you can find all year and it’s perfect for baby blankets and pajama pants.

IMGP0404

This velour and flannel blanket is a standard sew right sides together, leave a little hole for turning, flip right side out, and edgestitch the perimeter kind of blanket. To add a little personalization, I added the monogram using the flannel backing material. Funny enough, I made another of these blankets about a year ago, I just used a different flannel but the same velour, and it was for a little boy whose name also started with a G. Maybe I’ll find some pics and share…

IMGP0402

For the monogram, I found a font I liked on Microsoft Word, printed it out in a size I liked (not too big, not too small), cut out the pattern, and then traced it onto the flannel. To get the letter to stick to the fabric without having to use pins, I used my spray ‘n bond fusible adhesive, which worked pretty great. With the iron on kind, it can feel a little stiff. A quick zig zag stitch around the edge of the letter, and there you have it, a soft and cuddly monogrammed baby blanket.

IMGP0410

I also cut and serged some quick flannel receiving blankets. Most flannel blankets sold in stores are not big enough to swaddle. To make a swaddling blanket, cut off just enough on the sides of the fabric to remove the selvages and then make the blanket at least 36″ long. This size is great for swaddling. And there you have it, easy and adorable baby gifts.


Oliver + S Garden Party Dress

 

IMGP0387While scrolling through my facebook feed a few days ago, I came across a 20% off promotional code for Oliver + S patterns (coupon code: 4QFEM while it lasts!), which was pretty great because I’ve had my eye on the Garden Party dress since it was released.

I was super excited because as much as I love Oliver + S patterns, they are a little pricey. And I totally get it, they are amazing in pretty much every way. I had to talk myself out of buying two additional patterns by reminding myself I have other Oliver + S patterns that I haven’t even sewn up yet. I LOVE these patterns! And the Garden Party dress is no exception. It’s completely adorable, as all Oliver + S patterns are.

IMGP0389

Since I just received a new quilting destashing package from my husband’s Aunt Pam a few weeks ago, I thought maybe I could use some prints she sent for my first take on the Garden Party dress. Hannah picked out the fabric combination.

She’s starting to get picky these days. I’m finding that they key element is pink! She actually wanted the dress to be made out of the pink geometric fabric that I used for the accent pieces on the front bodice, but I didn’t have a large enough cut of fabric to work with. This dress is not really season appropriate in colors or print, and honestly, it’s a little bold for my taste, but I think she’ll like having a dress that she picked out.

IMGP0382

The Garden Party dress is a pretty easy sew that I think would be appropriate for a beginner. The gathers on the front and the general fit of the dress are pretty forgiving. I sewed a size 2T since Hannah is petite for her age. I could probably even go down a size and just lengthen it, but I’d rather make it a little large for her to grow into rather than too small. One great thing about this dress is it can be a bit roomy without looking too baggy. And it fits nicely in the shoulders despite the roominess.

After sewing up this dress and seeing how beautifully it came together, I was thinking it might be a great pattern to use for a satin Christmas dress. Maybe just use a longer sleeve pattern from another Oliver + S pattern to give it a more formal and winter appropriate look–possibly the Playdate dress sleeve.

IMGP0384

And speaking of sleeves, they are the only part of this pattern that I’m not super crazy about. They are cute, I just prefer the look of an elastic casing over a fuller, more open sleeve. Although, I suppose that style of sleeve might be really great for a light summer dress.

IMGP0393

And here is a view of the back closure. I’m going to sew a thread chain using the Oliver + S tutorial here as the pattern calls for, but for now, a quickly stitched on ribbon will do.


Sleeping Beauty Costume

IMGP0351

Hannah wanted to be Wonder Woman for Halloween. She was absolute about it…for a couple of days. Since then, she has been firm on Sleeping Beauty. Of all the princesses, this is the one I was least wanting to sew. The off the shoulder bodice and the peplum skirt just seemed like a lot of work…and they were. But I’m super excited with the final product. The costume I dreaded most of any costume I’ve made so far, but the one that I might be most proud of in the end.

Since I was really unsure of how I would draft a Sleeping Beauty costume, I scoured the internet for ideas. Not many out there, so I bought the Simplicity 5835 pattern on ebay. Don’t get me started on store bought pattern sizing! Again, a total fail with the sizing. So again, I turned to the trusty Geranium dress pattern and used the Simplicity pattern as a guideline.

IMGP0361

I lengthened the bodice a few inches and used a zipper instead of buttons. The zipper was definitely not done in the proper way, but it works for a costume.

For the sleeves, I used a long sleeve pattern I already had. I tried to make a v-shape hem using a facing, but it’s not very obvious. Oh well. It was a last minute thing after I had already attached the sleeves and I was afraid to cut too deep a v shape and make the sleeves too short.

IMGP0359

For the peplum skirt, I used the Simplicity pattern as a starting point, then drafted my own. I made it one piece and attached it to the bodice before attaching the skirt. It was a good natural stopping point for the zipper and looked better without a seam down the middle.

And for the off the shoulder look, I decided to do the easiest thing possible. Rather than do anything to change the construction of the bodice to include a fully attached collar piece, I took the easy route and sewed a fabric tube. I gathered it and attached it to the front bodice along the gathering stitches and then attached it to the back of the back bodice, sewing along the zipper seam line. Easy and done.

IMGP0352

The crown and necklace were pretty quick and easy. I used the Simplicity patterns but assembled them differently than called for in the pattern. I made the crown one piece instead of two sewn together. I also fused the gold lame fabric to yellow felt using spray ‘n bond instead of using stiff interfacing. Even though the crown is fairly floppy, it stands straight up like it should when worn.

And that’s Hannah as Sleeping Beauty. Phew, done with Halloween sewing! Yipee!


Fall Foxes Geranium Dress

 

IMGP0336

There is no better basic dress pattern than the Geranium dress pattern from Made by Rae. I have made so many variations of this dress that I’ve lost count–definitely more than ten! And anytime I need to make a dress and I don’t have the right pattern (like this year’s Halloween princess dresses, which you can read about here and here), I just modify the Geranium dress to get what I want. It fits perfectly EVERY SINGLE TIME! My girls have different body types and it still fits them both perfectly.

IMGP0340

This Geranium dress was a little bit unplanned. Usually I like to pick a pattern first and then find a fabric that suits the pattern. It was the opposite this time around. I had this fabric from Joann’s that I thought was adorable and just didn’t know what to make with it. I realized that fall is quickly passing us by and so I wanted to make something cute, quick, and easy. The Geranium dress with cap sleeves fit the bill.

IMGP0343

I added the red ribbon to break up the mostly neutral tones and to give the dress an added pop. Since I didn’t really have any buttons that matched, I just went with clear buttons. Not the best buttons for the dress, but certainly acceptable. Besides, the ribbon is what I wanted as the main embellishment anyway.

I was a little worried about the large print, thinking it might be overwhelming on such a little dress, but it looks great. And it is especially precious on my sweet Katie, who by the way is getting three teeth right now. Yikes!


Oliver + S Felt Bow Scrapbuster Tutorial

IMGP0258

When you find a fabric you love it’s hard to part with the scraps, even if they are weirdly shaped and don’t seem usable. When sewing one of my favorite dresses, the Oliver + S family reunion dress (read about it here), I found this FREE felt bow tutorial on the Oliver + S website. Since I loved the fabric I used for the reunion dress so much, I used fusible heat ‘n bond to use up some of my scraps to make an adorable matching bow. And with some new favorite scraps from some recent projects, I decided to revisit the felt bow pattern and to write up a quick tutorial. To make a scrapbuster felt bow you’ll need…

felt scraps

fabric scraps

scissors

spray ‘n bond fusible adhesive or iron on double sided heat ‘n bond

tailor’s chalk or fabric marker

Oliver +S felt bow pattern & tutorial

IMGP0220

First, download and print the Oliver + S bow pattern. I printed the two sizes that were mentioned in the tutorial, 100% and 60%. Once you have your pattern cut out, find some felt and fabric scraps that are slightly larger than the pattern pieces.

IMGP0226

Spray the WRONG side of your fabric scraps following the directions on the spray can. If you are using fusible heat ‘n bond, same thing. Apply it to the WRONG side of your scraps following the directions on the packaging.

If you are using spray ‘n bond, be very careful and protect the surrounding area. I did it in the garage and placed the scraps on some broken down cardboard boxes. Glad I didn’t attempt this in the house! This was my first time using spray ‘n bond and it sprays much stronger and faster than I anticipated. I wasn’t sure how much to spray. I think I’ll have to experiment a little with this. And honestly, I think for this project the fusible kind might be better and provide a stronger bond.

IMGP0229

This is what the back side of my fabric looked like after I sprayed it and let it sit for a few minutes. It has a slightly textured look and feel. Once it’s dry, which is pretty immediate, place the fabric scrap WRONG side down onto your felt scrap.

IMGP0236

Use a press cloth to adhere the fabric scrap to the felt scrap following the directions on the spray ‘n bond can or the heat ‘n bond packaging.

IMGP0237

Once your fabric scraps are bonded to your felt scraps, use tailor’s chalk or a fabric pen (…or a ball point pen) to trace the pattern. If you plan to wrap the bow center around a headband or a clippie, you may want to make that piece slightly longer than the pattern to give yourself some leeway. You can always cut it shorter later on.

IMGP0247

Cut out your pieces…making sure to trim off any pen markings from tracing if you used a ball point pen. Once you have your pieces, follow the Oliver + S tutorial to assemble your bow.

IMGP0258

Attach to a headband or a clippie and enjoy! An adorable pattern, and even more adorable with your favorite fabric scraps!


Vintage Junebug Dress

IMGP0195

I made a Halloween Junebug dress for Hannah last week, which you can read about here. I wasn’t planning on making another Junebug dress in the near future, especially with more costume sewing to do, but I stumbled upon this print in the clearance section at Walmart. I almost resisted until I saw it was only $3 per yard! Couldn’t pass it up.

IMGP0191

I love vintage feedsack prints and it was totally perfect for the classic/vintage look of the Junebug dress. And the piping and large buttons add even more vintage charm. Love it!


Cinderella Costume

 

IMGP0171

When I asked Katie what she wanted to be for Halloween, she said Rella. I was sort of joking when I asked her, thinking she wouldn’t really get it since this will only be her second Halloween, but she seems to understand and has not wavered since I first asked her. Despite Hannah’s daily attempts to get Katie to change her mind for some unknown reason, Cinderella it is.

I intended to use the Simplicity 2563 pattern that I already had, but unfortunately the muslin I made was too wide, even sewing one size down from what Katie normally wears, so I ditched the Simplicity bodice and skirt patterns in favor of the tried and true Geranium dress pattern from Made By Rae. One of the best sewing purchases I’ve ever made!

IMGP0167

To alter the Geranium pattern to look more like the Simplicity one, I lowered the neckline on the bodice about an inch or so to make it more of a scoopneck.

I also made the front bodice two pieces so that there would be a seam in the center front. To do this, I simply added a seam allowance to the fold line of the Geranium pattern, cut two, then sewed them together to create a front bodice with a center seam.

I didn’t do the pointed base on the bodice like the Simplicity pattern because I didn’t want to fuss with it while attaching the skirt.

IMGP0175

The Geranium dress does not include a sleeve pattern, so I used the Simplicity sleeve pattern and followed the Simplicity elastic casing guidelines. I’ve done this before and it’s always turned out perfectly.

For the puffs around the waist, I used the Simplicity pattern piece. They are simply large circles folded in half, gathered along the curved edge, and then basted to the bodice before attaching the skirt. Having the seam in the front of the bodice helps to line up the puffs in the exact center of the dress. A bonus to adding the extra step.

IMGP0161

And finally, the Simplicity headband and a grosgrain ribbon necklace to complete the look.

IMGP0173

And there you have it, miss Katie as Rella. She is one happy girl!


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 295 other followers